Extracurricular Activities in Resume

4 min read

Have you been avidly participating in extracurricular activities? Were you in the school’s dramatic society or sports club? Why not highlight your fun side on your resume? Don’t undermine the importance of minute yet significant details that can tell an employer about your personality and skills. There are extracurricular activities that can display your competence and character. Picking the right details and presenting them might be tricky; you can’t mention winning a singing competition to land an IT job.

In this post, you will learn on adding extracurricular activities in your job resume

What should we Write in Extracurricular Activities in Resume?

We have some suggestions on describing your participation in activities that can benefit your job hunt!

Here is the list of top 6 extracurricular activities to include in your resume.

  • Display your Role in Student Council
  • Flaunt your Sports Activities
  • Account for your Volunteering Efforts
  • Your Job Resume can have Peer Tutoring Experience
  • Hobbies that can be related to a Particular Position
  • Do Include your Love for Languages

Display your Role in Student Council

Being part of the school or college student council is something you should be proud of. It gives an estimation of your responsibility and teamwork. You can add the experience of managing events, critical thinking, and decision making based on your responsibilities in the council. This will strengthen your resume.

Flaunt your Sports Activities

Being a sports person gets you entitled to the team playing, work ethics, and dedication. It doesn’t matter if you won or lost a game, if you have been regularly playing in the school or college team, tell the employers about it. However, do not mention if you were a cheerleader or a player replacement, it wouldn’t look impressive on your best resume templates.

Account for your Volunteering Efforts

Not everyone volunteers for social, environmental, health, and other causes. Many people take it as an unpaid and unappreciated job, so if you have been a volunteer, it will make the employers perceive you in a certain way. Being humane, considerate and an empath is something an employer would commend in a candidate. Don’t share stories of how you rescued a suicidal cat; be short, sweet, and relevant.

Your Job Resume can have Peer Tutoring Experience

If you did peer tutoring, that manifests your ability to help others and communicate effectively. For every job position, communication skills are mandatory; your tutoring experience would imply that you can interact well with people at the workplace. You can also mention the specific topic or subject you taught if it is relevant to the job you are applying for.

Hobbies that can be related to a Particular Position

Yes, we have mentioned not to include hobbies during resume writing but if you write poetry and fiction in your free time, that can get you considered for a creative content creator job. Similarly, if you like fixing old machines that make you an ideal candidate for a technician’s position. Tweak the hobbies according to the job post but don’t list down your love for eating desserts and breaking your own sleep record for any job application. Avoid making up hobbies for the sake of fitting into a position.

Do Include your Love for Languages

Having proficiency in multiple languages would count for an added advantage especially if you are applying for a multinational firm. If you took a course for French, Spanish, or some other language during school or college days, that need to be included on your resume. Make sure to have proof of the language proficiency and be truthful about the basic, intermediate, or advanced level you claim. Don’t get yourself into trouble by bragging about basic know-how of a language.

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Can you think of more extracurricular activities that can bring your informal and fun side to your resume? Share your ideas with us in the comment section!

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